Header Space 1 Header Space 2 Header Left Header Center Header Right

Newsletter

Subscribe to the NW VEG e-newsletter

Race for the Animals

10th Anniversary Celebration

VegFest

Health Conference

Become a Member

Membership Discounts

Volunteer

Master VEG Program

VEG 101 Classes

Dining Guide

Business Supporters

Presentations

Facebook Twitter MeetUp Instagram YouTube

News

Newsletter Archive
Ask the RD: Alison Ozgur
September 2, 2012
Alison is a Registered Dietitian specializing in health and fitness nutrition. She has nearly twelve years of experience helping clients reach their nutrition and weight loss goals and is the co-author of Go Beyond Good: The Trail to a Lifetime of Health and Vitality. Do you have a question for Alison? Email us at info@nwveg.org.

Q. Is there a link between cancer and soy intake?
A. Much of the current evidence strongly suggests that soy does not promote cancer, but that it reduces cancer risk. In his book Healthy at 100, author John Robbins notes:

“The elders of Okinawa have repeatedly been shown to be healthiest and longest-lived people in the world. This was demonstrated conclusively in the renowned Okinawa Centenarian Study, a 25-year study sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Health. The researchers conducting the study analyzed the diet and health profiles of Okinawan elders, and compared them to other elder populations throughout the world. They concluded that high soy consumption is one of the main reasons that Okinawans are at extremely low risk for hormone-dependent cancers, including cancers of the breast, prostate, ovaries and colon. Compared to North Americans, they have a staggering 80 percent less breast cancer and prostate cancer, and less than half the ovarian cancer and colon cancer.” Additionally, a large study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in 2003 found that women with a high intake of soy reduced their risk of breast cancer by 54 percent compared to women with a low intake of soy.

To learn more about the research and benefits of soy intake, attend Dr. Mark Messina’s lectures on the “Health Impacts of Soy Foods" at our upcoming Health Conference on September 21 and Portland VegFest on September 22 and 23.

Click here for the latest news.